The student news site of La Salle Catholic College Preparatory.
Mr.+Devine+said+that+even+though+Into+the+Wild+was+published+over+two+decades+ago%2C+it+is+relevant+to+many+of+our+lives+in+quarantine.+

Brian Devine

Mr. Devine said that even though “Into the Wild” was published over two decades ago, it is relevant to many of our lives in quarantine.

Mr. Devine

Vice Principal of Student Life Mr. Brian Devine suggests the book “Into The Wild” by John Krakauer.

He described this non-fiction biography as chilling, absorbing, and thought-provoking. He chose this book because of its connection to social distancing and quarantine that is happening due to COVID-19.

This book is about Johnson McCandless, who hitchhikes to Alaska and walks all by himself into the wilderness of Mt. McKinley. Four months later, he is found dead and decomposed by moose hunters.  

Mr. Devine said this is one of his favorite books because he appreciates “the insight it provides into the mystery of why Chris McCandless walked away from civilization and into the wilds of Alaska,” he said. “I read it at a time in my life when I was contemplating many of the same questions that Chris was wrestling with.”

When Mr. Devine used to teach junior English, he would use this book to introduce the major themes of American Literature because he said this book captures them well.

Mr. Devine said that “during this time of quarantine and social distancing, this book seems especially poignant because it asks the questions, what happens when we are socially and physically isolated? What are the things and experiences we [can] live without? How does an experience like this pandemic impact us?”

Mr. Devine said that he has probably read this book about five times, and suggests it to anyone who also enjoys the books “Wild” by Cheryl Strayed or “A Perfect Storm” by Sebastian Junger. 

“The students that I have shared this book with in the past have really enjoyed it,” he said. “It is a gripping page turner. It is a compelling mystery. And despite being published over two decades ago, it is entirely relevant to what we are all experiencing right now.”